Decoupage a Vintage Lampshade

This post was originally posted March 27 on ModPodgeRocksBlog.com. Go check it out for some more fun decoupage projects.

A while back, we made a lamp from an old tripod. It needed an unusual lampshade so we made one from galvanized duct work. But time went by and it was time for a change – something lighter and brighter and funkier. When I think funky, the first thing that comes to mind is 60’s fashion (doesn’t everyone?). Learn how to decoupage a lampshade just like this one below.How to decorate a lampshade with vintage graphics Continue reading

Hammer Like A Girl Class at Second Use Building Materials

We are excited to announce we are giving a class about designing with salvaged materials at Second Use Building Material on Sunday, May 18th. See details below. We hope you can join us, it should be a fun time!

SecondUseWorkshopPhotoBand

DESIGNING WITH SALVAGED MATERIALS WORKSHOP
Sunday, May 18th | 11-12:30 | Presented by DIY Blog Hammer Like A Girl | FREE

Second Use Building Materials  3223 6th Ave. S.   Seattle, WA 98134   206-763-6929

Do you wander through Second Use wondering and wishing you could re-purpose some of the awesome stuff into your home or life, but end up leaving it all behind for another day – AGAIN?

Heidi, Monica and Mary Jean, will be at Second Use Building Materials to share some of their projects and tips to help you envision and then reshape salvaged materials into unique home improvements and functional art. Their projects range from transforming a discarded old car jack into a light fixture, to reusing multiple materials collected (sometimes stored for years) into a bathroom remodel.  Come join the fun and take away some inspiration!

RSVP to Mary Anne Carter

Email Mary Anne

Up-cycled Bookends from Salvaged Brackets

Bookends cleaned

We were cruising the aisles of Second Use the other day and came across some really cool, heavy industrial brackets – cast iron we think? More truth about us: we can never resist interesting metal stuff – so for $5 it was added to our stash. We stopped by Daly’s Paint and quizzed them about primer and paint – the goal was to get a heavy coat on the bracket as if it had been dipped in a super thick, semi-glossy, paint which would then contrast with the rough and industrial nature of the iron. Alas, no great way to make our paint thicker – but we did have some older water based paint that had thickened on its own due to poor storage technique (what can we say) and the color was nice, so – Bob’s your uncle. Continue reading

Visualize Your Ideas, Part 2

It’s that time of year again, when we take inventory of unfinished projects and brainstorm additions/remodeling. Sometimes it helps to mock things up full scale, or see your ideas in multiple ways. We’ve written about this before here – to help you along here are a few more strategies that have worked for us:

Backsplash Mock Up

Draw on Your Walls:

You have our permission. Take a piece of chalk and a damp rag and draw your ideas full scale onto your walls. Erase them with the rag. *You may want to test this first so you can guarantee the chalk is coming off completely. Be sure to include any trim, knobs, switches, outlets, curtains, door swings, etc. This really helps to reveal any potential difficulties with your design, for example: in the above photo I have to decide how high to make the back-splash in relation to the window sill and the window division; should the tile end just short of the orange wall or go to the corner and how will the top trim piece terminate? And this is just one corner of the kitchen… Continue reading

This Plus That Equals: Industrial Coffee Table

We found these HUGE casters at Second Use (where else?) and immediately thought “coffee table”. (Actually what I immediately thought was that the husband would kill me if I brought home another big metal piece of randomness – like this and this and this.)

RedCasters_Before

8″ diameter industrial casters.

Plus

WoodPlanks

Planks from RE-Store, planed.

Plus

GasolineCan

Old Gas Can from Habitat for Humanity.

Equals_reverseRedCasterCoffeeTable_after

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Visualize Your Idea: Build a Quick Model

Here’s a tip: If you have a design idea floating around in your head – a new deck, staircase, fence, arbor, etc… build a quick model from cardboard or balsa wood. You don’t have worry about being too precise or neat – it just helps to see your idea in 3-D so you can see it from various angles.

Below are a couple of prototypes we’ve made – as you can see we weren’t too worried about fine craftsmanship, but it gave us an excellent idea of how things would work together and what modifications to make to the final plan. Continue reading

Handmade Holiday Market

HandMadeMarket_SecondUse

We are excited to announce that we will be participating in Second Use Building Materials’ first-ever Handmade Holiday Market. It will be held Sunday, December 1st from 11am to 4pm at Second Use (3223 6th Ave S, Seattle, WA). Come visit us and see what we’ve been up to! We’ll have lots of holiday gifts and home accessories made from salvaged material – framed art, memo books, wrapping paper, lighting, tables, cupboards and more.

Make a Home Office Pendant Light

I needed a light for my workspace. I wanted to find a really awesome Pendant Light. I poked around online and found some that were amazing, but a little too expensive for me to handle. I had a very basic $17.00 IKEA pendant light left over from my kitchen update. $17-40.00 was more like my budget. But, it was so small and lacked any funk at all. Plus it looked like it belonged in a kitchen.

Original Ikea Pendant Light

I was hoping to snag an inexpensive, awesome, retro light from Second Use Building Materials or RE Store. Continue reading

Industrial Wall Sconce from Salvaged Objects

upcycled_sconce_process

We had gathered a few things and thought it would be fun to try to make a retro vintage industrial adjustable salvaged upcycled (not gonna say “steampunk”) wall sconce.

What we started with:

  • insulated ceramic electrical pulley thingy (REStore, $4)
  • old industrial safety glass light + screw-on aluminum cover (REStore, $10)
  • upper wooden part of an old stand/podium (Goodwill, $1)
  • old cement fishing net weight from Wisconsin (Mother-in-Law, free)
  • braided cloth-covered electrical wire (Sundial Wire, $1.45/foot)
  • “vintage” light bulb (Lowe’s, $9)
  • new socket, in-line switch and plug (hardware store, $7-ish)

What we ended with:

Question for you:

We talked previously about opening a little Etsy shop and selling some of the things that we make (it could be that some members of our families are getting sick of weird light fixtures in their house). We were considering selling (at least attempting to sell) some of these light fixtures there, but started worrying about the liability. Have any of you out there had any experience with that sort of thing? Or have any advice for us? We use all UL approved parts, yet we’re worried – we aren’t licensed electricians.

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Using Salvaged Doors in a Remodel: Part 1

One way to get immediate character in a house remodel is to use salvaged doors. Old doors can be beautiful, with great quality and craftsmanship. Depending on availability, it can also save you money. On the downside, using salvaged doors can take patience, planning, and elbow grease. Other downsides include the possibility of lead paint and dings/imperfections (although one girl’s dings/imperfections are another girl’s patina). Second Use Building Materials has great information on using salvaged doors on their do it yourself page on their website. Update! We love old doors so much that we’ve written yet another post here.

Where to Find Salvaged Doors:

We got all these doors from Second Use Building Materials in Seattle. We were able to find 15 matching 4 panel painted doors to use for all the room and closet doors. For the other larger/unusual openings we found some natural wood (cedar? fir?) doors that someone salvaged out of an old building. They had them stripped of paint and had them stored for use in a future home that was never built. Somehow they ended up at Second Use and we were ecstatic to find them there. I wish I could say we installed all these doors ourselves, but we hired a carpenter for this project. (That is probably why it got done.)

There are several ways to use salvaged doors in a house, whether it’s a remodel or new construction. Continue reading