Quick Update for a Plain Built-in Cupboard

A quick project.

This built-in in our dining room has always bugged me with its flat doors that have no detail. Dining room built-in, 1911 house.

The other doors in our house have a simple raised shaker style border, which aren’t so fun to dust, but look nice.

While we were painting the floors it dawned on me that it would be pretty easy to give the doors a quick facelift with some trim. The husband said “sure, it’s a good idea, but it’s certainly not a priority right?” I said “oh right” and then went out the next day and bought some inexpensive molding. He rolled his eyes.

It was pretty easy – it took about 4 hours. This is how we did it:

  • Purchased Trim. We used hemlock lattice molding (.25″ x 2.25″).
  • Removed doors. We unscrewed the doors from the frames.
  • Carefully measured and cut (with a chop saw) trim to fit door.
  • Notched out trim for hinges with X-Acto knife and chisel/hammer.
  • Applied wood glue to the back of the trim, lined it up on the face of the door, and clamped the heck out of it. Protected trim from clamp marks with wood scraps.
  • Let it dry overnight.
  • Filled in any gaps with Elmers Wood Filler.
  • Sanded and eased edges slightly with hand sander.
  • Primed, painted.
  • Re-installed.

Here’s what it looks like now. I also got some new simpler bin pulls and knobs. The husband’s comment was “oh sure, I guess it looks better – but, would you ever paint the entire built-in a color? It kinda looks like primer right now.”

What do you think? Should I paint it a color?

Dining room built-in after, with added shaker style border.

Dining room built-in (after) with added shaker style border.

Decoupage a Vintage Lampshade

This post was originally posted March 27 on ModPodgeRocksBlog.com. Go check it out for some more fun decoupage projects.

A while back, we made a lamp from an old tripod. It needed an unusual lampshade so we made one from galvanized duct work. But time went by and it was time for a change – something lighter and brighter and funkier. When I think funky, the first thing that comes to mind is 60′s fashion (doesn’t everyone?). Learn how to decoupage a lampshade just like this one below.How to decorate a lampshade with vintage graphics Continue reading

The Fireplace is Finished!

I know everyone is probably sick and tired of hearing about this fireplace. Believe me, no one is as tired as I am.

As a reminder, we were going to paint the floor. But before that could happen we had to lay a new hearth. Before that could happen we had to get rid of the old wood stove (which stuck out in the room) with a new wood stove (which doesn’t).

We got the new wood stove (Camano by Avalon, a local company) at Kirkland Fireplace. They were able to cut down the legs of the stove to better fit the opening. It was installed by Top Hat Chimney (425 827 4657), who did a wonderful/ingenious job figuring out how to fit it into an existing opening with an existing chimney liner and still getting it flush with the opening. If you ever need any work done on your fireplace, I highly recommend them. Plus they are super funny.

After installation, we were left with a hole in the face of the fireplace. The trick was to figure out a way to patch it without it looking patched. Then we could finally tile the hearth.

FireplaceBefore

The new Avalon wood stove and the hole left behind by the pipe of the old wood stove.

The main problem was the odd bricks. They have a chiseled tapered border. I researched looking for replacement bricks – I couldn’t even find a name for the style. After some thought, we decided to tile the inset area and create a ledge from angle iron. This way, we only had to deal with one replacement brick.

This is how it turned out:

FireplaceFinished

The “Madison” sign is an old street sign from Seattle (it’s also where the husband is from). I wasn’t so fond of the logo on the stove, so I attached the sign with magnets to cover it up.

And this is how we did it. Continue reading

Craftsman Trim Installation

A while ago, we stripped/prepped some wood for our Craftsman trim. I was afraid it was going to take a while to get it installed, but we had a spurt of energy and got it done! We matched the trim style of the rest of the main floor, read more about that here.

Finished Office Trim:

Office_after

Finished Craftsman style trim, matching the original trim style of our 1911 bungalow. Salvaged Fir doors from RE-Store.

OfficeDoor_final

Finished trim on the office door, opening was added during the remodel. Salvaged divided light hinged door from Second Use Building Materials.

Continue reading

Up-cycled Bookends from Salvaged Brackets

Bookends cleaned

We were cruising the aisles of Second Use the other day and came across some really cool, heavy industrial brackets – cast iron we think? More truth about us: we can never resist interesting metal stuff – so for $5 it was added to our stash. We stopped by Daly’s Paint and quizzed them about primer and paint – the goal was to get a heavy coat on the bracket as if it had been dipped in a super thick, semi-glossy, paint which would then contrast with the rough and industrial nature of the iron. Alas, no great way to make our paint thicker – but we did have some older water based paint that had thickened on its own due to poor storage technique (what can we say) and the color was nice, so – Bob’s your uncle. Continue reading

Stripping and Re-using Old Painted Trim

We are in one of the final phases of our decade-long remodel – putting up door trim. We wanted to use some old (and decrepit) painted trim that we had removed during the demo, but it looked like crap. But when we looked a little closer, it just looked like crap on the surface, so we decided to get the heat gun out and remove the several layers of paint that were gunking it up.

OldTrim_before

Old trim, before stripping.

Continue reading

Hearth Removal: Concrete, Jackhammer, Persistence

The hearth re-do.

Our intention was (6 months ago) to remove the existing mortar bed of the hearth so we could lay a new tile hearth flush with the floor. I’m embarrassed to admit that we haven’t made any progress with this project since last spring. For a reminder of where we left off, read this post.

A quick re-cap: we removed the wood stove and its tile pad, revealing “faux” tiles made from concrete which sat on a mortar bed.

FireplaceHearth_before

The first layer of concrete was easy to remove with a chisel and hammer, but there was a very stubborn layer of concrete underneath. We went to work on removing it. Continue reading